Function Position

As we covered in the article on Cognitive Functions, everyone uses all four cognitive functions (T, F, S, and N) in both Versions (introverted and extraverted), for a total of eight Function Attitudes (Ti, Te, Fi, Fe, etc.).

Since we all use all eight Function Attitudes, what determines the sixteen types that people belong to?  That's where function position comes in.

Function position describes where a particular function attitude is 'located' in a person's mind.  It's important to note that function position is not a literal map, but rather a model through which we can conceptualize types.  There is no physical place in the brain that corresponds to the Dominant function, for instance.  Instead, our diagrams of function position are simply a shorthand which allow us to describe how each type uses each function.

Because function positioning uses models and not maps, there are multiple models that typologists have created.  Most of them describe the same thing, just visualized differently.  It's like showing the same data with a bar graph vs. a pie chart - the information they contain is the same, but we can format it in different ways.

Because of this, it's very important to understand the model a typologist is using in order to understand the information they're trying to convey.  For an overview of some of the most popular function models, check out this reddit post that we wrote.  We aim to cover each more in depth in the future on this website.

The model we use in all discussion of theory on this site is an amalgamation of several pre-existing typological models.  We are tentatively calling it the Constitutive Model, or ConModel for short.  I hope you will find it relatively intuitive to grasp.  Let's take a look.

Constitutive Model

 The Constitutive Model is comprised of eight function positions, sorted by function valuation and function strength.

The valued functions - those which we prefer to use and experience - are found on the lefthand side of the model.  These functions are called ego-systonic because they align with the values and goals of the ego (our sense of self).

The functions on the righthand side of the model, however, are the unvalued functions.  These functions are called ego-dystonic because they stand in contrast to our values and goals.

The strong functions - those which we use most dexterously and comfortably - are found in the top four positions of the model.  You will notice that we have two strong valued functions and two strong unvalued functions.

The weak functions, on the other hand, are those found in the bottom four positions of the model.  Again, we each have two weak valued functions and two weak unvalued functions.

Let's briefly look at each block and see how this model applies to each personality type.

Valued + Strong
(Ego Block)

The strong, valued functions are also called the ego block.  They represent the parts of our personality that we identify with, or see as "ourselves" or our identity.  They also represent the primary functions that we consciously prefer to use in the world.

The strongest and most valued function is the Dominant function.  This is our persona, or the main 'character' we play, both in the world and in our own minds.

The dominant functions of each type are:

ExFJ: Fe
ExTJ: Te
IxFP: Fi
IxTP: Ti
ESxP: Se
ENxP: Ne
ISxJ: Si
INxJ: Ni

The other strong and valued function is the Auxiliary function.  This is our parent function, the function we use to help us accomplish the agenda of the dominant function.

The auxiliary functions of each type are:

IxFJ: Fe
IxTJ: Te
ExFP: Fi
ExTP: Ti
ISxP: Se
INxP: Ne
ESxJ: Si
ENxJ: Ni


Valued + Weak
(Super-Id Block)

The weak, valued functions are also called the super-id block.  They represent the parts of our personality that we view as attractive and desirable but lacking in ourselves.  We are weakly aware of these functions and do not have much conscious control over them, but we enjoy having them stimulated by others.  They represent the primary functions that we prefer to receive from the world.

The first weak valued function is the Tertiary function.  This is our child function, which we primarily associate with play, creativity, and novel low-pressure situations.

The tertiary functions of each type are:

ExTP: Fe
ExFP: Te
IxTJ: Fi
IxFJ: Ti
ENxJ: Se
ESxJ: Ne
INxP: Si
ISxP: Ni

The weakest valued function is the Inferior function.  This represents the 'anima' or 'animus', which is Jung's name for the part of ourselves which represents the greatest psychological draw or desire.  It is the thing we most long to experience and become, yet it usually lies tantalizingly out of reach.

The inferior functions of each type are:

ESxP: Ni
ENxP: Si
ISxJ: Ne
INxJ: Se
ExTJ: Fi
ExFJ: Ti
IxTP: Fe
IxFP: Te


Unvalued + Strong
(Id Block)

The strong, unvalued functions are also called the id block.  They represent the parts of our personality that we view as easy and effortless, but lacking in importance or relevance.  We often consider them to be either trivial or private.  We do not identify with them or notice them in ourselves, although they are often evident to others (especially the demonstrative function).

The first strong unvalued function is the Ignoring function.  This is our advisory function, which we find simple to use in service of our dominant function but prefer to keep private.  This function is most often on display to others when we are explaining a concept or giving advice.

The ignoring functions of each type are:

IxFP: Fe
IxTP: Te
ExFJ: Fi
ExTJ: Ti
ISxJ: Se
INxJ: Ne
ESxP: Si
ENxP: Ni

The other strong unvalued function, which is in some ways stronger than the ignoring function, is called the Demonstrative function.  This is a function which we rely on heavily in many aspects of our life and which we display to others almost as much as our Dominant function, but which we do not identify in ourselves.  We consider it trivial to use and are often critical of either an excess or a lack of it in others.

The demonstrative functions of each type are:

INxP: Ni
ISxP: Si
ENxJ: Ne
ESxJ: Se
IxFJ: Fi
IxTJ: Ti
ExFP: Fe
ExTP: Te


Unvalued + Weak
(Super-Ego Block)

The weak, unvalued functions are also called the super-ego block.  They represent the parts of our personality that we interpret as being expected of us by society, but in which we are lacking.  We may seek to improve them in ourselves, but because they are both weak and unvalued, such attempts at improvement are often short-lived.

The first weak unvalued function, which in some ways is our weakest function of all, is the Vulnerable function.  The vulnerable function represents our greatest source of pain and discomfort, the areas which we are most unaware and powerless to interact with.  However, in a way, they also represent a source of freedom, as we are in many ways unburdened by the concerns of these functions.

The vulnerable functions of each type are:

IxTJ: Fe
IxFJ: Te
ExTP: Fi
ExFP: Ti
INxP: Se
ISxP: Ne
ENxJ: Si
ESxJ: Ni

The other weak unvalued function is called the Role function.  This function operates primarily as a mask which we wear in high-pressure situations to shield our Dominant function from scrutiny.  We are able to use it in a stilted, 'fake' way, and although we often approve of the use of it in others, we do not really understand it.

The role functions of each type are:

ISxJ: Ni
INxJ: Si
ESxP: Ne
ENxP: Se
IxTP: Fi
IxFP: Ti
ExTJ: Fe
ExFJ: Te


Recap



Dominant

Auxiliary

Tertiary

Inferior

Ignoring

Demonstrative

Vulnerable

Role

ENFJ

Fe

Ni

Se

Ti

Fi

Ne

Si

Te

ENFP

Ne

Fi

Te

Si

Ni

Fe

Ti

Se

ENTJ

Te

Ni

Se

Fi

Ti

Ne

Si

Fe

ENTP

Ne

Ti

Fe

Si

Ni

Te

Fi

Se

ESFJ

Fe

Si

Ne

Ti

Fi

Se

Ni

Te

ESFP

Se

Fi

Te

Ni

Si

Fe

Ti

Ne

ESTJ

Te

Si

Ne

Fi

Ti

Se

Ni

Fe

ESTP

Se

Ti

Fe

Ni

Si

Te

Fi

Ne

INFJ

Ni

Fe

Ti

Se

Ne

Fi

Te

Si

INFP

Fi

Ne

Si

Te

Fe

Ni

Se

Ti

INTJ

Ni

Te

Fi

Se

Ne

Ti

Fe

Si

INTP

Ti

Ne

Si

Fe

Te

Ni

Se

Fi

ISFJ

Si

Fe

Ti

Ne

Se

Fi

Te

Ni

ISFP

Fi

Se

Ni

Te

Fe

Si

Ne

Ti

ISTJ

Si

Te

Fi

Ne

Se

Ti

Fe

Ni

ISTP

Ti

Se

Ni

Fe

Te

Si

Ne

Fi

Further Reading

Now that you understand Cognitive Functions and Function Position, you are ready to move on to Function Strength.

You may also wish to learn more about each individual function.  Links will be provided as the relevant articles are made available.

Fe
Te
Fi
Ti
Se
Ne
Si
Ni